Halloween Article & Recipe: Candy Corn Harvest

Nothing says Halloween quite like Candy Corn
Nothing says Halloween quite like Candy Corn
Nothing says Halloween quite like Candy Corn

Halloween Season is the time of year to harvest candy corn. In fact, October 30th is National Candy Corn Day. Trick-or-Treaters and party-goers the United States over enjoy a nice handful of an iconic sweet.

In the 1880’s, George Renninger developed the confection while working for the Philadelphia, PA-based Wunderle Candy Company. It imitated dried kernels of corn, featuring a wide band of yellow at the bottom, orange center, and white tips of the slightly triangular candies. Sugar, corn syrup, carnauba wax, and water are cooked to form a slurry, then fondant, marshmallows, and coloring are added.

Before mechanization, the candy was crafted by hand, but most is now made by machines.With its iconic coloring, candy corn is used as garnish and in Halloween displays. It has become such an intrinsic part of the holiday that it features in costumes, including sweet candy corn witches. Manicures and Pedicures for fashionable hands and feet sometimes feature the candy corn color combos.

Oreo Cookies now offers a seasonal Candy Corn flavor
Oreo Cookies now offers a seasonal Candy Corn flavor

Because of the popularity of the candy, special variations of candy corn are manufactured for the celebration of  holidays other than Halloween. Brown-bottomed harvest corn and plump marshmallow pumpkins lend variety to the autumn offerings. Also advertised are “Reindeer corn” featuring Christmas colors, pastel “bunny corn” for Easter, and “Cupid Corn” for Valentine’s in pink, white, and red. The National Confectioner’s Association estimates over 25 million pounds of the candy is sold annually, though traditional candy corn remains the most popular.

Recipes featuring the flavors of candy corn abound. Fudges and mousse are layered to imitate the bountiful harvest, drinks featuring the marshmallow-like flavors, and cakes come to mind. One party favorite is the Candy Corn Jello Shot, which can be made in kid-friendly or adults-only form:

 

Family friendly version of the Candy Corn Jello Shot:

Ingredients:

Box lemon Jello

Box orange Jello

2 packets unflavored gelatin

2 Cups boiling water

Whipped topping

Clear shot glasses

Preparation:

In a small bowl, combine packet of unflavored gelatin, box of lemon Jello, and 1 Cup of boiling water. Stir until dissolved. Add to clear shot glass until 1/3 full. Chill in refrigerator for 20 minutes.

Then, in a small bowl, combine packet of unflavored gelatin, box of orange Jello, and 1 Cup of boiling water. Stir until dissolved. Spoon orange mixture into shot glasses over set, yellow gelatin. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Top with whipped topping for serving.

For the ADULTS ONLY version:

Add 1 Cup boiling water to 1 box of lemon Jello. Stir to dissolve. Add 3⁄4 Cup vodka and 1⁄4 Cup cold water, stir to combine.

Fill shot glass 1/3 of the way. Chill for 20 – 45 minutes. Repeat with orange Jello, spooning orange atop yellow to another 1/3. Refrigerate for an hour. To make cream, combine 1⁄2 cup water and 1⁄2 coconut cream in a sauce pan. Sprinkle with package of unflavored gelatin. Allow to rest for 2 minutes. Stir over low heat for 5 minutes. Remove from flame. Stir in 1⁄2 cup whipped cream vodka until combined. Spoon atop the shot glasses. Chill for 3 hours or over night. Serve.

Samhain: Facts, Beliefs & Folklore

Vintage Irish Halloween art

Halloween:  hallow=holy  een= evening

The Celtic Festival of Samhain celebrated in Scotland circa October 2008
The Celtic Festival of Samhain celebrated in Scotland circa October 2008

All Hallow’s Eve or All Saint’s Eve (whatever you call it):  it is the old Celtic harvest festival of Samhain, pronounced sow (as in cow)-en.  Celebrated in Ireland and ancient Britain this was the mark of the New Year, the time that summer was ending and the onset of winter beginning.

A magical time when the veil between the worlds of the living and dead was at it’s thinnest.   It was believed that the dead revisited their homes and the fairies came out to roam.  Some say Samhain was the God of Death but there is no evidence to back this theory.  The Celts didn’t believe in demons, instead it was fairies that were the makers of mischief.

In order to stave off any mischief from occurring during the evening of Samhain, home owners would set out a “treat” of milk or food in hope of deterring any “tricks” being played upon their household.  A small meal would also be left for a deceased relative who came visiting.  In the 19th century the Catholic Church made Nov. 1st All Saints Day, thus the pagan festival of Samhain merged with the Catholic holiday and became All Hallow’s Eve (the night before the holy day).  Eventually people began to dress up to deceive the spirits and therefore go out during All Hallow’s Eve to walk freely among the spirits and perhaps collect the “treats” left for the dead?!

 

Vintage Irish Halloween art
The legend of Stingy Jack gave birth to the Jack-O-Lantern

Irish folklore tells the story of Stingy Jack who tricked the Devil not once but twice.  After being tricked into captivity by Jack a second time the Devil agreed not to take Jack’s soul when he died.  However upon his demise Heaven didn’t want him either, so Jack asked the Devil to take him but since a promise was made the Devil sent him on his way into the night with a burning piece of coal to light his way.  Jack carved out a turnip to hold his coal and has been wandering ever since.  Folks began to call this lost soul “Jack of the lantern” and later shortened it to “Jack O’Lantern.”  Later the Scots and Irish began carving scary faces into turnips and potatoes and set them in front of their homes on All Hallow’s Eve to keep away the evil spirits.  When the Irish began immigrating to the U.S. during the potato famine they brought along their traditions.  Pumpkins which are a native fruit to the U.S. became an excellent replacement for turnips.
 
 
 
 
 
Another thing associated with Halloween is dunking for apples.  That was actually part of divination rituals performed at the end of the year to see what the future would bring.  “Ducking for Apples” foretold marriage.  The first person to bite one would be the first to marry in the new year.  Another divination ritual was peeling an apple, the longer the peel before breaking off the longer your life.

So remember with Halloween soon approaching, leave a little something out for the visiting relatives!

TALES OF POE Autographed Poster Giveaway!

Tales of Poe autographed promotional poster
Tales of Poe autographed promotional poster

We have sung the praises of the horror movie, Tales of Poe, from the start of our website.  The movie is currently on the film festival circuit,  and we can’t wait until you are able to watch this incredible terror anthology inspired by the work of Edgar Allen Poe.
 
The Tales of Poe folks were kind enough to sign a promotional poster and allow us to give it away on the Halloween Forevermore website!
 
It is signed by: Alan Rowe Kelly (director), Bart Mastronardi (director), Caroline Williams (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2), Adrienne King (Friday the 13th), Tom Burns (composer), Brewster McCall (The Cask actor), Bette Cassatt (V/H/S 2) and Michael Varrati (writer of the Dreams segment).
 
Enter our Facebook contest by following this link to the giveaway, whether you are on a mobile device or desktop.
 
 
This contest ends on September 19th at Noon PST!
 
 
Check out our review of the film by clicking here.
 
Check out a video we shot at the Tales of Poe movie premiere by clicking here.

 

HEROIN IN THE MAGIC NOW Now Available!

Heroin in the Magic Now cover
Heroin in the Magic Now cover
HEROIN IN THE MAGIC NOW is not for the easily offended!

Horror author and HFM managing editor Terry M. West celebrated the release of his highly anticipated horror novella today. Heroin in the Magic Now, described as a dark, paranormal cross between Breaking Bad and True Blood, is now available on Amazon in Kindle and Paperback formats.

Synopsis: HEROIN IN THE MAGIC NOW explores pain and hell. The story is set in a dark make-believe New York. The Night Things have climbed onto our shores from the shadows and they are now part of the system. Gary Hack, a down on his luck exploitation film director with an appetite for heroin, finds himself working in the dangerous world of monster fetish videos.  Gary is made an offer he can’t refuse by Johnny Stücke, an immortal crime boss. The video Johnny envisions could be the greatest zombie fetish film ever created. But it could also ignite an apocalypse that could destroy the city. HEROIN IN THE MAGIC NOW is original, startling and brutal. BONUS: Included with the first tale is a lengthy preview of HEROIN IN THE MAGIC NOW 2.

Early reviews have been extremely kind. As we cautioned in an earlier post about this book, it is a dark and extreme tale and it is not recommended for minors or the easily offended. But if you are ready for a true tale of horror, order here!

 

Check out the book trailer:

Article: WHY DO GROWN MEN WATCH GODZILLA FILMS?

Godzilla 1954
Godzilla 1954
The original Godzilla was a serious movie with a message. The sequels? Not so much…

Why Godzilla films?

Many people may ask “Why do grown men watch Godzilla films?” My wife and daughters don’t understand. When a Godzilla film is on, they roll their eyes and make quick passage through the living room, lest I stop them to explain the ridiculous plot, for no apparent reason.

 

Aside from the original 1954 Gojira, with its serious tone, sociopolitical statement, and allegory sentiments, the entire franchise is not exactly aimed at adults. The films are a myriad of pseudo-science, hokey plots, simplistic storylines, and fantasy elements. They often contain plot-holes big enough to drive a monster truck through.

 

Godzilla vs The Sea Monster
Mr. G picks out a big one for his surf and turf dinner!

So, why the infatuation?  I will attempt to answer that burning question.

 

Give a young boy (age’s two to ten) a set of blocks and what will they do? They will stack them as high as they can, stand back to study their accomplishment, then run up and kick them down. If you have two boys in the room they will race to be the one who will kick down the blocks first.

 

It’s the conqueror ego. It’s the desire to level the playing field. It’s a release of frustrations in a somewhat controlled environment.

 

Godzilla vs Mothra (aka The Thing!)
What’s in the egg?

Man is born with an inherent penchant for aggression and destruction. It’s part of the survival instinct that keeps him fighting even when the odds are against him. Throughout man’s existence, natural violence was a part of his struggle. In the most recent 100 years, man has taken much of that natural violence out of his life. We have secure homes that shield us from predators and violent weather (most of the time). We don’t have to hunt for food or compete for hunting grounds against other men/tribes/clans. We only have to walk into a supermarket where meat is laid out in trays and packaged in plastic, under bright lights and light FM, elevator music.

 

Some men will turn to sports, throwing their hands in the air and roaring when their team beats the opposing team into submission. Young men will turn to loud music, banging their heads, waving their fists and even mosh-ing to release pent-up aggression. And an even smaller percentage of men will turn to giant monster movies. They see Godzilla kick down a building and relate that to themselves as young boys, kicking down that stack of blocks.

 

Naturally, we don’t want to see this kind of destruction in real life. We love to see tornados on film from a safe distance, ripping a roof off a barn. But we are saddened and empathetic when we see the devastation up-close and see the hardships they cause real people and families. We like to see buildings topple, explosions burst into giant fireballs and laser-beams or heat-rays cut through city streets, but are taken aback when we see the real devastation of an earthquake or the loss of innocent lives in a terrorist attack.

 

Battle Royale
Kaiju battle royale!

What we see in these films is fantasy. Sometimes we cheer for mankind, up against what seems to be an unstoppable force. Sometimes we cheer for the giant monster that can destroy the arrogant man’s world and re-teach him to have respect for mother earth and her adept system of balance.

 

We are happy to be out of the constant violent struggle of nature but we still have that adrenaline induced instinct that needs to be called upon during emergencies. And that muscle needs to be flexed. So stand back from the Blu-Ray/DVD remote and let us kick our blocks down…metaphorically speaking.

My Fantasy Horror Anthology

Cover to Shock
Shock Magazine featured Sturgeon's BRIGHT SEGMENT
Theodore Sturgeon’s BRIGHT SEGMENT was published in this 1960 issue of Shock Magazine!

You have heard of fantasy football; picking players from NFL teams to forge a strong team of your own to compete on paper. Well, I want to do the same type of thing but in a way horror fiction fans would appreciate. I don’t know if this has ever been attempted, but if it has, it was surely by a horror nerd with too much weed and time on his/her hands.

Compose your own table of contents for what would be your ultimate horror anthology. There are no limits. Choose from any author you want, at any time you want. So here is my fantasy horror anthology, and though the names may be as familiar to you as your own family, you will notice a mix of obscure tales, that I think should be reexamined (I am an admitted B-side lover), and you will also notice selections that are considered staples of the genre by many fans. For time and space constraints, I will pick ten here as my choices. Just remember, it’s my party…

The very first story would be one by a man better known for his science fiction, but a home run hitter in whichever genre he chose to flex his creative muscles. BRIGHT SEGMENT by Theodore Sturgeon would by the first title affixed to this ultimate anthology of mine. Written in 1953, BRIGHT SEGMENT concerns a lonely old man who finds a near-dead prostitute on the streets. He brings her in and nurses her back to health. As she strengthens and threatens to leave his care and this bright segment of his draws to a close, the old man takes measures to extend his newfound happiness. This is an absolutely brilliant tale that inspires revulsion and sympathy with the same tug.

A Stephen King photo from the '70s
Terry’s favorite Stephen King short stories are the early ones.

So next we look at the work of Stephen King for inclusion. I am a child of King, in so many ways. But my favorite works of his go back to his older tales. And my first King tale for inclusion would have to be NONA. First published in an anthology in 1978 called Shadows, Nona is either a figment of the narrator’s imagination or a seductive and evil siren of murder who asks repeatedly at the end, “Do you love?”, before she turns into a hideous creature and leaves the narrator alone in a graveyard for the police to find. NONA is Lovecraft-inspired gem and it elicits creepiness from any of us who have ever loved, and maybe found a little madness in our devotion.

We are not done with King, yet. NIGHT SURF was printed in Ubris magazine in 1969. It was the seed from which THE STAND would sprout. It is a post-apocalyptic tale about a group of teens gathered one night at Anson Beach in New Hampshire. They glow and warm near a bonfire, but the fire that lights their night burns with depraved, solemn and desperate purpose. The group burns a man at a pyre to appease the Gods and protect themselves from a disease called A6 (or Captain Trips).

Clive Barker
Clive Barker around the time BOOKS OF BLOOD exploded onto the horror scene.

We come now to the works of Clive Barker and his inclusions will not be the expected standouts. There will be two tales selected, half-filling my collection.

IN THE HILLS, IN THE CITIES is my first of the Barker tales. Two gay men try to rekindle their love on a vacation to Yugoslavia. Mick and Judd bear witness to the macabre war between two villages, Popolac and Podujevo. Each town is represented by a mass of thousands joined in uniform and violent purpose. A battle between two giants occurs, and this is one of the most inspired Barker tales you could ever endure. It is breathtaking.

My second Barker contribution would be HELL’S EVENT. It concerns a contest where Hell is given the opportunity to take and rule the Earth. There is a race in London, and a shape-shifting representative of Hell participates. Joel, a human competitor in the race, realizes the stakes he is running for. This is a bloody and humorous piece of Barker fiction.
My next selection would be the classic YOURS TRULY, JACK THE RIPPER from the great Robert Bloch. It was printed in Weird Tales in 1943. It is a very famous tale, and many horror fans have heard the title in relation to highly regarded pieces of horror literature. But let me ask you a question… have you ever actually read it? It is an intense and well-researched imaging of the infamous serial killer as an immortal who must make human sacrifices to continue his bloody existence. It is masterfully crafted by Bloch, whose creative intensity never dulled. The man was a talented craftsman, indeed. He is largely considered a writer’s writer. And he was a member of Lovecraft’s circle.

Poised to terrify at the seventh spot would be I SCREAM MAN by Robert McCammon. In this tale, McCammon takes something as innocuous as a family game of Scrabble and turns it into a triumph of absolute dread. McCammon is a master at taking familiar and safe boundaries and wrapping them around your throat. He is a powerhouse.

SHATTERDAY is the eighth selection, and it is a story by one of the most enduring voices of speculative fiction, Harlan Ellison. Peter Jay Novins calls his own phone by mistake, and he answers it. Soon, it is revealed that an alter ego is planning to take Peter’s miserable life away and replace him. Peter sickens and slowly fades as his former shadow gains substance and lives a more happy and successful version of Peter’s life. Yes, this was an episode of the revival Twilight Zone series, but the story from Ellison’s collection (itself called Shatterday) is an absolutely chilling tale of losing your identity and purpose. It straddles the genre fence, but inspires enough dread to land here on my list.

The next to last of this fun little excursion would find Charles Beaumont’s THE HOWLING MAN. Beaumont would adapt his 1960 short story into a famous episode of Twilight Zone. The Howling Man concerned David Ellington, a man on a walking trip through Europe who shows up, lost and ill, on the doorstep of a hidden castle. There, he discovers that a man is held prisoner by a group of monks. The monks claim their prisoner is the devil himself, and he can only be released by removing the staff of truth from his prison door. Beaumont was one of the most influential authors of the strange and dark, and his work has inspired several in the genre. And he is a name I would proudly include in this make-believe collection.

My tenth spot would feature THE YELLOW WALLPAPER, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It chronicles a woman’s journey into madness, as she is locked away by her physician husband. The woman is stored away quietly to recuperate from a slight hysterical tendency. The woman slowly begins to have visions in the patterns of the wallpaper in the room that imprisons her. An important and classic tale, which you should seek out if you have not read it, that is also an incredible piece of feminist literature.

So, there would be my top ten. And were this list to continue, you would see tales from Poe, Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Richard Matheson, Hugh B. Cave, Peter Straub, Ramsey Campbell, Rex Miller, Joyce Carol Oates, Rod Serling… trust me, the list could easily run into triple digits. The ten I have listed are stories that I hold a particular fondness for. They are stories that have touched me, and left a mark.

If you are inspired to seek any of these tales out, then I have served a purpose here today.